Question: Why do you play?

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Working on a community post, so-to-speak, that will feature responses to the question:

Why do you play?

Care to join me? Start writing!

Submissions are due by end of the day Friday (2/9).

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Song of the Deep – Lost in the current with my son

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The search begins.

As Song of the Deep’s protagonist Merryn built a submarine to search for her lost father, Wyatt looked at me:

“If anything were to ever happen to you, I’d build a submarine and come find you too.”

Preparing to dive.

Into the oceanic abyss we dove, deeper and deeper. The couch, our submarine. Wyatt deftly piloted the helm. Until controller dexterity issues arose when we encountered electrified jellyfish. Fighting with the sub’s mechanical arm while steering was just too complicated for him. So I took over. He watched.

In the abyss.

We journeyed through a sunken city, wondering what had happened to this lost civilization. Wyatt grew bored. He didn’t ask to pilot the sub again. Song of the Deep frustrated him. This coming from the kid who can hold his own in Guacamelee and PixelJunk Shooter.

End of Watch.

Insomniac’s Song of the Deep is a “passion project” influenced by Brian Hastings, chief creative officer at Insomniac Games. Brian said that he wanted to create a heroic character to share with his 10-year-old daughter. I applaud him for that.

This game is pretty.

I had hoped that the underwater beauty and awe inspiring moments were something I could actually share with Wyatt. The movement of the submarine proved to be too much of a barrier. Dated puzzle mechanics, such as adjusting light mirrors (ugh), further threatened to sink our voyage.

I wanted Song of the Deep to be more confident in itself to be different and new. Game mechanics resurrected from the era of Ecco the Dolphin come across as hazardous underwater currents. Currents I want to avoid.

Ecco lives!

Ecco lives!

Bottom Line: Song of the Deep is challenging and entrancing in it’s beauty. I like that I can play the game in front of Wyatt. I just wish co-piloting was a tiny bit easier. But skills will improve. Difficulty will be overcome. 

wavesplinter3/5 – Great game to play with your kids. Co-piloting may prove challenging depending on your child’s skill level. 

Wave SplinterTitle: Song of the Deep
Developer: Insomniac Games
Platforms: PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Reviews on: PlayStation 4
MSRP: $14.99

*Song of the Deep was reviewed using codes provided by Insomniac Games.

On Phone Interviews

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I had the opportunity to take part in a phone interview this week for a position I had recently applied for. The recruiter opened by asking some general questions about myself. This being a faith-based company, I was also asked about my involvement with church, etc. The interview was cruising along until I was told that I lacked the necessary experience. The recruiter said that he would like me to come in and interview for a lesser position within the company. One that happened to pay what I made per hour in high school.

unsplash-bonus

I realized immediately that I was being undervalued. I disagreed with the recruiter’s assessment. My resume and experience reflect that I am well suited for the position. I figure when you start to disagree with an interviewer, something is wrong. The interview is much like a first date, everyone is putting their best foot forward. This interview was a misstep at a dance.

Defenses up, I listened to the marketing spiel about the company. A spiel I had read, word-for-word, on the company’s website. The interview left me with a disingenuous taste, as if manipulation had occurred.

  • The Negative: “Your skills are lacking.”
  • The Positive: “…but we have another opening that pays next to nothing!”
  • The Positive, Positive: “…and we are promoting on a weekly basis.”

In the end, I declined a further interview. Chalk this one up as a learning experience and keep on applying. The white whale exists.

Videogames and Men

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We need more writing like this:

“As any football fan or regular participant in golf, ultimate frisbee, or Settlers of Catan will confess, embracing make-believe battles isn’t in itself a sinful or even unwise act. What matters is one’s perspective. For anyone who plays videogames, there must be a commitment to proper perspective. The game is not the ultimate reality, even while playing it. The player should see the game as an experiment, not as a genuine set of priorities and goals, but as a pretend set of priorities and goals. Videogames should be viewed as opportunities to practice and explore the values and commitments we make with ourselves and with our God. Just as men ought not genuinely despair over a lost football game, men who play videogames should learn to accept failure as an integral part of the experience.” – Richard Clark, Videogames and Men

Announcing Something New: JBG Blog

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New experiences are a way of life – remember the last time you decided to try some sashimi and regretted it later? – .  In order to further the Johnny B Gamer experience, we have decided to add a section dedicated to blogging. Here you will find links, videos, and thoughts that are not always going to be videogame related. Hopefully this will help facilitate discussion outside of our regularly scheduled content. Enjoy!