12 Inches of Deception – A Tale from Risk

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It’s your turn.

You place one guy, at a time, on a territory of your pick.

Eventually, you place another guy on a different territory. And another, and another, and another until all your men have been placed.

The dice of power, domination, and rule enter your hands. Which territory to attack first?

Passing the dice of defense to a fellow player, you begin your turn. Who will win?

Risk
I’m safe in Australia, I swear!

Buried beneath 12 inches of snow, Tabitha, Wyatt, and I decided to play a game of Risk.

Phase 1: I Think I Can!

Tabitha placed most of her pieces in North America. I didn’t think much of it as I had Australia and the tips of South America and South Africa. My reasoning was that I could battle my way north to victory while still maintaining a base of operations (Australia).

Phase 2: I Thought I Could

Well… my strategy was a bust! Tabitha fought against Wyatt and I like a whirlwind. Before I knew it, Wyatt was gone from the game (haha!). Within the few fell swoops, Tabitha did me in and won. SHE WON!

Risk

I didn’t see Tabitha coming. I was clearly the superior Risk player here. Heck, I’ve played a 24 hour game of Risk before. I was going to win… until I didn’t.

Congrats again, Tab!

What’s your favorite snow day, rainy day, death from above day game to play?

Classic Disney Cartoons Failed Me

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Classic Disney cartoons ill prepared me for snow in East Texas.

Scenes filled with Mickey and Minnie skating across the ice? Nope.

Scenes filled with Huey, Dewey, and Louie battling against Donald Duck in an epic snowball fight? Nope. Our snow is sandwiched between two layers of ice. Sandwiched! Even if you can get through the first layer, the snow underneath is powder. Not an ideal snowball building material… at least not here.

Luckily our power has still worked, our heater is running, and my wife did grocery pickup before the storm hit. East Texas, for the most part, has had it pretty easy. I think there is something about the constant thunderstorms (re: death from above), in the spring/summer, that keep our powerlines in working order. The storms are good for something, I guess.

So how about you? What is the weather like in your neck of the woods?

Why Do We Play?

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A few weeks ago, I asked the Theology Gaming Community:

The TG Community answered:

  • Entertainment
  • Bridge gaps of distance
  • Stories
  • To slow down and enjoy friends
  • To learn new systems/rules
  • To be invited into a piece of art, by the artist, as a collaborator
  • To forget about problems
  • Video games are fun
  • Enjoyment
  • Escapism
  • Fantasy of having increased power/capability
  • Gaming brings people together

Sam went on to say:

Mainly it’s my time to ‘turn off’ from any sort of stresses in real life and just sit back and enjoy something. But there are other huge things I’d miss if I wasn’t gaming. Mainly the excellent communities you become a part of, and I have found, since starting college, it’s a great way to keep in touch with friends who went elsewhere.

Joe emailed me his reply:

Apollo 13 is one of my favorite movies. It’s a classic tale of man versus adversity. Human ingenuity wins out over a catastrophe that almost certainly should have spelled certain death for the three brave crewmen. It’s a great story to watch, but as a viewer I can only be a passive observer of this story. Kerbal Space Program, however, allows me to be the solution as well as the cause of all my Kerbonaut’s problems. What should be a routine trip around the moon turns into an epic series of rescue mission because of my inability to effectively design spacecraft. Running out of fuel, botched engine burns, missing solar panels, and the inability to dock two spacecraft turn Kerbal Space Program into an interactive rescue simulation. The best part of all this? My experience will never be exactly the same as anyone else’s. 
That’s the appeal of gaming to me: personalized entertainment. While most games will offer a similar overall experience to its players, little details and interactions are unique to each person. Nobody has the same struggles as I do in Kerbal Space Program. My approach to clearing Liberty Island in Deus Ex will be different than anyone else I know. Dark Souls fosters camaraderie with fellow players who follow the same story beats, even though not everyone will struggle with the same sections. Though I play the same game as thousands and millions of other people, my own experiences with that game are unique to me. This is what sets gaming apart from every other form of media. It’s fun, it’s dynamic, and it’s accessible. Why wouldn’t I play games?  

For me, gaming is about:

Relationships  The conversations that happen while trying to outscore my wife in King Domino.

Nostalgia – Playing Chess with my son reminds me of all the times I played Chess with my Grandpa. I miss him and those times we had together playing Chess, flying remote control airplanes, and telling stories.

Imagination – As with good books, video games allow me to visit other worlds and step into the shoes of someone else.

Discovery – Digital worlds come with their own individual sets of rules. I love seeing what a game world will allow me to do/not do.

Connection – Nothing like discussing games with fellow enthusiasts, taps into my nerdier side.

Sampling All The Flavors – I love constantly trying new games which allows me to experience the different gaming mechanics they each bring to the screen.

Why do you play?

Abuse of Power

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For the Spirit God gave us does not make us timid, but gives us power, love and self-discipline. – 2 Timothy 1:7

I think that Christians often follow parts of the above verse found in 2 Timothy. We read it as a green light to go forth and speak our minds with power–we will squash you fools!–. Our failure is that we do not live out the second part of the verse, the part that talks about acting with love and self-discipline. Yes, brothers and sisters in Christ, God gives us power that is only balanced with love and self-discipline. This means that we can be bold in talking about our faith with others as long as it is done through the lens of love and keeping ourselves in check, by the Spirit.