From Across the Net – “The best parenting decision I ever made”

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Love this. Reminds me that I need to start up Boy’s Club again with Wyatt. Be purposeful.

When I was growing up a man in my church gave me perhaps the greatest gift I have ever received…weekly, uninterrupted, quality time. Mr. Zechman was a busy guy. He had four busy and successful daughters of his own. He was involved in our church and community in all sorts of ways. He had a demanding job and was a public figure in our town. He was the kind of guy who should not have had time for a goofy ninth grade boy like me. And yet he made time.

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From Across the Net – “Infertility Prepared Me to Reach Other Childless Men”

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Infertility, at times, whispers to me in the darkest recesses of my soul. Telling me that I am a failure.

I am thankful for those, in my church, who have dared to bridge this gap. I am thankful for a God, who loves my wife and I so much, that He has called us out of the grieving process and into adoption. That doesn’t mean that we don’t still have bad days. 9 years of nothing still haunts us. No, this means that we now focus on what He can provide… versus us. I am thankful for His hope.

This piece about gutted me this morning. Reminds me that Satan speaks into the silence of where fellow Christians are afraid to go… But we have to.

“I have so many questions about why this isn’t happening for us,” Neil told me, “and what we should try next.” For Neil, these questions included the ethics of using donor eggs or donor sperm, whether an adopted child would ever feel like “his own,” plus age-old questions about God and suffering. This is hard terrain to navigate, one I have seen precipitate theological shifts into unorthodox territory when people lack pastoral guidance.

“All my friends are fathers and grandfathers,” another man told me. “And me? I’m nothing.” When infertility robs you of being a father, what else can you become? This can be a key question for infertile men.

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Loving Enemies With Your Thumbs

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I have been previewing Wyatt’s devotional book we just started for the year. Prereading so that I:

  • Can ask questions for bedtime discussion/prayer
  • Know what he is reading/accountability

The devotional entry for today was titled “It’s all about the Thumbs”. It talks about how we act and ultimately behave on social media. I thought the entry was bit funny as Wyatt isn’t on social media (Facebook has a rule where you have to be at least 13 years old to open an account). I am thankful we have not had to go down that road yet.

Verse of the Day:

But love your enemies, do good to them, and lend to them without expecting to get anything back. Then your reward will be great, and you will be children of the Most High, because he is kind to the ungrateful and wicked. – Luke 6:35 (NIV)

After surveying the entry for today, I wrote down some questions for him to think on/answer before we talk tonight (he writes his answers down in a small notebook):

  • How can you show kindness to others while playing video games (which IS something he does with his thumbs)?
  • What makes you mad when playing video games?

Photo by JESHOOTS.COM on Unsplash

Having a devotional time with your kids doesn’t have to be long. The key is moving forward and doing something while being intentional. Already, in the few days we’ve been going through this new bedtime routine, I’ve noticed that the discussion questions have given us specific needs to pray over. This is a good thing as I’m often not sure what to pray over with him.

362 days to go. Habits take 2-3 weeks to take hold. Why not start a devotional time, with your own kids, and join me?

Discipleship and Online Communities

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11049542_990975067580576_2183769705003188231_nOn the side, I work as a Community Manager for Theology Gaming University (TGU). We are an intimate Facebook Group that enjoys healthy debates, Jesus-infused conversations, and videogames that challenge both our skills and thinking.

I recently shared this quote and response with the group:

“Christianity without discipleship is always Christianity without Christ.” – Dietrich Bonhoeffer

When I think of discipleship, I think of The Great Commission: “Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, 20 and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.” (Matthew 28:19-20)

Discipleship is something we do as we GO. Discipleship is active and ongoing. For the TGU Community, this means keeping Christ at the forefront of our conversations. That we aren’t simply here to talk about videogames but to challenge each other in faith and life.

How does one challenge/sharpen iron with another online? I think this is far easier than any of us think. I have grown, as a Christian, due to members of our group. I have learned that there is far more nuance, differing cultural perspectives, and grace than I once thought. Our denominational differences have allowed me to see Christ in videogames where I didn’t think He existed (thinking of my friend Josh and Journey).

This is the purpose and unspoken mission statement of Theology Gaming University, personal growth. Whether you are a Christian or a non-Christian, I hope our discussions cause you to pause and think.

I love our community and the respect that we have for one another, despite all coming from different countries, cultures, and backgrounds. If you have not yet joined TGU, I want to personally invite you to come be a part the discussion.

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