From Across the Net – “Help! My Child Games Too Much!”

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Daniel Burton, over at Love Thy Nerd, hits the nail on the head with his article “Help! My Child Games Too Much!“. I can’t preach this enough:

  • Move All The Electronics Out Of The Bedroom: While this will make you the most unpopular person in the house, this is for everyone’s benefit. Seeing the games your children are playing becomes increasingly difficult when the door is closed. This goes for internet access and phones as well. With all the dangers present on the internet, unmonitored access behind closed doors seems more irresponsible than convenient. We should absolutely trust children to make smart, wise decisions, but that doesn’t mean we should make it easy for them not to. Trust but verify. When you bring everything out into the open, they become a part of the family and not a hermit who leaves their bedroom only to come out for meals. Open access provides accountability and, whether they like it or not, encourages children and teens to behave responsibly online.

I get tired of hearing stories of parents giving their kids unlimited access to the Internet, in their bedrooms, and the kids finding porn.

You can read Daniel’s entire article here.

How Night Terrors Forced My Family To Unplug

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You never forget the moment where you wake up to your child screaming. The bleary-eyed rushing to their room only to find them awake but not awake. The early night terrors Wyatt experienced were full of him:

  • Tracking objects, with his eyes, that were not there… but if you watched him, you’d think there was something.
  • Shivering, teeth chattering to the point you’d think that they might break.
  • Pure terror.

Night terrors make a parent feel helpless as it is hard to convince someone, who isn’t awake, that there is nothing trying to kill them.

Tabitha and I started to notice a pattern though. Looking at our bedtime routine, we were watching TV, specifically playing videogames, up until the point Wyatt went to bed. So we re-evaluated our evening routine and turned off the television. 

For me, being the dad who loves sharing gaming with his kid, this killed me. KILLED ME! The effort it takes to read a book aloud or play a boardgame is far more than turning on the TV and playing a game. Call this being a lazy dad at the time, I admit it now. But our evenings changed for the better. The night terrors, which seem to be caused by a combination of electronic stimuli and tiredness, slowly faded away. Over the years, with each book we read aloud, each boardgame we played, we slowly learned to interact more as a family in the evenings.

Today, I can’t say everything is perfect. The night terrors like to rear their heads on the occasion (but are more infrequent). We still watch TV shows before bed, but we have learned that certain TV shows don’t seem to trigger the night terrors as much as others (I think it has something to do with the amount of blinking lights). Our family reading time has segued into Wyatt having his own reading time at night.

My Little Scythe

Smart parenting often requires sacrifice. In our case, that has meant moving any gaming time away from bedtime (we’ve noticed that an hour buffer works). I’ve learned that I can still game with my son but that often it is good to shake things up with no screens. The battlefield of the Chess board, the trophies of My Little Scythe, all work together to make non-screen memories and keep the night terrors at bay.