Personal Preferences and Media Consumption

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Back on this date in 2017, I asked the following question on Facebook:

Parents: How much do personal preferences play a role in what media your child consumes?

The general response was that personal parental preferences play a huge role in what media a child consumes. I know that for years, in my home, I have curated and encouraged consumption of specific video games, shows, and movies. Part of that is me being an engaged parent; the other part of that is wanting to show my son what quality media looks and feels like.

Super Mario Odyssey represents quality media.

Over the years, my son has watched a few shows that have driven me nuts. There has been nothing wrong with these shows, content-wise, but the voice acting and plotlines just seemed inane. Something I’ve had to learn, as a parent, is that sometimes my kid is going to like something I do not.

The big bad video game, in my house lately, has been Fortnite. A typical match looks like:

  • Picking a place on the map to start out in
  • Scavenging for weapons
  • Trying not to make a lot of noise and survive
  • Engaging fellow players with the weapons I’ve collected while trying not to become a victim of the virtual Hunger Games.

I have found that I enjoy the satisfaction of staying alive and making it into the final 5 players alive. Knowing that 95 other players have been eliminated and that I’m one of the few remaining is a good feeling. But I dislike how aimless Fortnite otherwise feels. I dislike the lack of direction, objectives, and how I have to make my own fun while surviving at the same time.

Fortnite does not fit my personal gaming preferences. This has taken me awhile to realize/put into words. But I’ve learned that there are times, as a parent, where you need to be quiet and explore the things your kids love. I may dislike Fortnite for many reasons, but I enjoy the time I get to play with my son. I have to focus on that positive, co-op play, and ignore the “we could be playing such-and-such game instead because that game is designed better” thoughts. Play in the moment, right?

Not in My House – PlayStation Classic

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Woke up this morning to read that Sony has decided to cash-in on the retro console movement with their own PlayStation Classic. This $100 PS1 features 20 games, including Final Fantasy VII. With my foot firmly in place, the PlayStation Classic will never enter my home.

The Foot is Down!

How else am I supposed to teach Wyatt about games curation and corporate greed? Take Final Fantasy VII for instance, the game is available on just about every format. As with Skyrim, I’m sure you’ll soon be able to play Final Fantasy VII on your refrigerator door. Greed lives on your refrigerator door. Don’t feed greed nor the need to play games on appliances.

The PlayStation Classic is worthless beyond nostalgia. Sony has had most of the PlayStation 1 library available for years on the PlayStation Store. The games are playable on modern consoles and televisions, right now. No special $100 box and original uncomfortable controller required.

I understood why Nintendo released the NES Classic and SNES Classic. Both featured games that were hard to find, expensive, and did not play well with modern TVs. Providing many popular games, in one box, with a save state feature, was a total win-win for gamers everywhere. Not so much with Sony’s PlayStation Classic.

I will not be spending $100 for what amounts to a repackaging of games already available on my PlayStation 4. I’d like to say that I’d be interested in a PlayStation 2 Classic but all of the games I’d want are already available in HD remastered glory, today!

You dug too deep into the gaming mine, Sony. You have plundered the riches of your history through constant availability. As for me and my house, we will not be buying a PlayStation Classic. Wyatt’s not getting one of these for Christmas.