Where I am with all things video games

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JohnnyBGamer.com has been quiet for awhile now. One of those times where I feel like I have nothing to say and a lot to say at the same time. Instead of sitting down and writing though, I’ve taken the easy route and not written at all. That all changed after reading a GameChurch article by Andy Robertson titled, “Don’t Do Video Games in Church, Do Church in Video Games“.

Games aren’t worthwhile because they educate, inform, develop skills or solve problems. They are valuable because they are games.

Andy helped me realize just where I am with video games. I’m not sure if it is my age or what, but I no longer feel the need to seek validation for the hobby nor advocate for it becoming something more, specifically in the church-space. I don’t care if video games are viewed as art or if fellow Christians think the pastime is evil. I think it’s great that Andy is championing for a deeper discussion on gaming, but that is no longer me. I play what I like, when I like, and I don’t care what anyone else thinks.

I no longer identify as a gamer, at all. I am a husband, father, and friend who happens to think video games are pretty neat. At this point in my life, I might play a game a few hours a week. Gone are my multiple day/hours long gaming sessions where that is all I would do in the evening–and ignore my wife in the process–. I am not that guy anymore.

Who I am now is:

  • A dad who is concerned over how much Zelda: Breath of the Wild has taken ahold of my kid.
  • Someone who is trying to figure out what gaming looks like in my household with the Nintendo Switch. I go back and forth over how much I love the system and how much I hate it. The singleplayer games seem to dominate game time in our house. I miss the more co-op atmosphere but also realize that my son is growing up and wanting to play things by himself (and talk about those experiences).

Part of me feels old and part of me feels free when it comes to video games. The part of me that feels old is the part that feels like my parents. My wife and I trying to figure out how much is too much and how to curate/guide my son’s gameplay. The part of me that feels free is the part that no longer feels like I have something to prove. I enjoy playing games when I get the chance. No matter the difficulty setting I play on; no matter how long I end up playing per week. Video games are still cool but they do not hold the place that they once did in my life.

I needed to write that. Admit it out loud.

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2 thoughts on “Where I am with all things video games

  1. Bryan, thanks so much for writing this out. Although my two boys aren’t as old as your son, I imagine I will be thinking/feeling some of the same things when they grow up. Also, on a personal note, I feel like I’m changing in how I approach gaming culture, too. For instance, I’m trying to buy less and enjoy what I have more. What’s the point of buying a batch of games at great prices if I never play them? Also, I am finding it harder and harder to identify with gamers and game journalists who spend a lot of time to playing. I don’t have that kind of time, and as a follower of Jesus, husband, father and youth pastor, I don’t think it’s wise or responsible to devote most of my free time to games. I enjoy playing games and plan to continue to do so, but there’s just so much more to life than games.

    • There is more to life than just games. Talk about a hard parenting lesson to convey to your kid who would rather immerse himself in Zelda than go outside.

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