Thankful for Small Things

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Driving by the school, which is down the street from my house, I scanned the playground. I realized that I was looking for a little boy who is no longer there.

When Wyatt was in kindergarten, I’d look for him on the playground while driving home for lunch. Hoping to catch a glimpse of him running and playing. Since making the decision to homeschool, I no longer have to look for my son elsewhere.

Last Friday, I found myself staring at the playground as I drove by. Got thinking about how God has provided for my family. Sure, we might not always have the newest clothes or are able to eat out all the time, but God has provided for the things that matter most to us. He has allowed us to:

  • Keep Tabitha at home, to allow her to be a full time wife and mom
  • Homeschool Wyatt

Regardless if either of those situations change, God is still good. I’m thankful that He has allowed us to pursue the small things that matter most to us.

What are you thankful for?

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Pushing Through the Fog of School

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Sending your child to school isn’t easy. You’re sending them off into the unknown. Sure, you know that there is safety and structure, but you have no clue what their teacher might be like. No clue what is going on in the classroom or the playground. Unless you ask.

To cut through the fog of school, you need to frame questions in a specific way. Questions that move beyond simple one word answers.

Instead of asking: How was school today?

Ask: Who did you play with today on the playground?

And as a follow up: What did you play?

Parenting is all about playing the role of the detective. Ask questions and then listen. Be present. Avoid distracting thoughts. Your child knows when they have your full attention.

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Questions to further push through:

  • What made you laugh today?
  • Who did you sit by at lunch?
  • What was the most fun part of your day?
  • Did anything surprise you today?
  • What did you learn in music (P.E., computer lab, etc.) today?

As you listen to your child, you’ll discover what frustrates and excites them. Don’t be afraid to turn one of their answers into a teachable moment. It is your job, as a parent, to help your child make sense of the world. To cut through the fog.

What questions do you ask your kids?