On My Radar: Dragon Quest Builders

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Love the theme of restoration. October can’t come soon enough!

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Feast & Fish – Boys Club Goes Fishing

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Wyatt and I went fishing for the first time this past weekend. The boy caught his first fish, a sweet bass, within moments of casting out. Might as well have put the rest of our time on repeat. The fish were hungry!

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My brother-in-law, Mike, tagged along. I’m thankful for his expertise and knowledge in an area where I am out of my depth. Mike did a great job not making fun of me or my “I’m not touching that fish” responses.

Would like to thank my church for hosting the Feast & Fish event. The fried food was good and the private lake fishing even better. I learned that piercing a worm, with a fish hook, multiple times, isn’t that big of a deal. Maybe next time I’ll actually handle a fish. Maybe.

From Across the Net: “Trench Run and the future of local multiplayer innovation”

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My video game trailer making friend, Josh, took some time to write on the future of local multiplayer innovation. I especially liked this:

Trench Run’s great innovation is deathlessness—players flop like fish once “killed” in the hopes of finding a health kit to get back on their feet. This means downed players stay in the game even when they’re “out.” Practically it means everybody has fun, even when somebody is dominating, because there’s always a chance to get back on your feet again (literally and figuratively).

(That’s me, Ransom64, playing with Josh and Zach.)

You can read more of his Indie Haven piece here.

I met my wife in hell

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I met my wife in hell. In the bowels of a Christian haunted house. I was playing some sort of motorcycle riding bad boy; she was playing the role of my sister. Nothing weird, just evangelism.

I remember my dorm floor chaplain asking me to be in the play. I wasn’t interested. And yet felt that I needed to be a part of this “scare people to Jesus” movement.

At our first practice, I was immediately attracted to the other woman playing my sister. You see, we had two casts that rotated turns acting throughout the night. No polygamy or Arkansas relationships going on here. Turns out I was attracted to a mean married woman. I’ve never known much about the lady folk beyond Jane Austen.

We rehearsed, rotated through the different walkthrough sets, finalized how things were going to go down. I didn’t notice Tabitha until the next night.

We were between scenes. It was late. I was laying across some chairs, tired. She didn’t see me and almost sat on me. We laughed. I knew I could talk to her about almost anything. I told her something about my Grandpa Ayers, not sure what. The sister I hadn’t paid a second thought to was suddenly front and center.

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Tabitha and I always laugh about how we first met. How we were both in a place where we had given up on dating, on finding the “one”. Heck, Tab wasn’t even supposed to be at school that semester. A cancelled class, much to her displeasure, put her on campus at the same time as me. God is funny.

Life hasn’t turned out the way either of us thought it would. I’m still working in an unhealthy work environment with zero room for advancement. We haven’t been able to have any more children beyond our only son. The Special.

I think we’ve been in a period of refocusing. Trying to figure out who we are as a family and who we want to be.

I’m not sure what the future holds. We could be leaving East Texas; we could be adopting children. I have no idea. But I do know that obedience to God, that stepping out and following Him, has always been hard but good.